destroycomics:

destroycomics:

The Rise of Aurora West Fanart Contest and Give-away!

After the success of The Battling Boy Magical T-Shirt Contest First Second and I organized for the release of Paul Pope’s Battling Boy this past October, we’re teaming again to announce The Rise of Aurora West Fanart Contest and Give-Away! Paul Pope’s friend and talented cartoonist David Mack will help judge the contest again!

In the next few months, comics has a few exciting rebrandings of established heroes starring female leads with Spider-Gwen and Batgirl, but First Second is offering up an original kid superhero in The Rise of Aurora West from the brushes of Paul Pope and David Rubin .

The Rise of Aurora West is the first in two prequel books to Battling Boy written by Paul Pope and JT Petty and drawn by the amazing David Rubin (Beowulf)! The prequel centers on Aurora West and how her relationship with her father and her past develop her into the character we see her as in the Battling Boy book.

Fanart Guidelines: Simply draw Aurora West. You can play with her design as you see fit. You can do straight-forward illustrations, comic strips, anything you want so long as Aurora West is the subject. Tag your piece #RiseAuroraWest. Winners will recieve a signed copy of The Rise of Aurora West by Paul Pope!

Giveaways! We’ll be randomly giving away several galleys of The Rise of Aurora West for the first two weeks of the contest based on who likes and reblogs this post. After those two weeks are up, the next two weeks will feature the same process, but the random few will win copies of the final book! You don’t have to follow this blog, but I recommend you do!

If you wish to buy a signed and skip the contest/give-away, Paul Pope is signing copies to be sent out from Word in New York.

Dates:

Aug. 26th to Sept. 9th- Galley Give-Away Winners are randomly selected.

Sept. 9th to Sept. 23rd- Book Winners are randomly selected.

Aug. 26th to Sept. 30th-All fanart entries must be submitted and tagged (If you don’t have tumblr email your entry to davezissou@hotmail.com) 

Winners will be selected and announced soon after.

Links: 

Follow Paul Pope: Website | Instagram | Twitter

Follow David Rubin: Website | Twitter

Follow JT Petty: Twitter

Follow First Second: Website | Tumblr | Twitter | Facebook

Contest poster by David Zissou

We all can’t wait to see what you can bring to Aurora West! Go and have fun!

Galley Winners have been selected and we’re now onto the giveaway for the book itself! 

And a reminder, the more people who reblog from you increase your chances of winning. Multiple reblogs are okay!



Look! My first zine! It’s a number for sad people who like dark places. Look at these sample pages.

Should be available for purchase online soon. Will also draw small doodle inside at request.

Also… Who’s excited to go to SPX?? Everyone on my tumblr and twitter feed. That’s who. I’m not tabling but I irresponsibly didn’t get business cards printed in time, so these may have to be traded, sold, or used as a business card in case I want someone to remember me.

Posted 1 week ago , with 3 notes


I used to do little paintings like this all to time for skill building. Completely forgot about them. They’re pretty much all clutter.

I used to do little paintings like this all to time for skill building. Completely forgot about them. They’re pretty much all clutter.

Posted 1 week ago


Been pretty busy planning stuff for my sister’s wedding. This is her guest book- a hand-painted & stained spruce round with a weirwood tree. (Yeah, there’s a slight Song of Ice and Fire theme.) Guests will write well wishes to their union on paper red leaves and afterward it will be resumed over to preserve nicely for future generations of House York.

Posted 1 week ago , with 1 note




http://panovanator.tumblr.com/post/91123019139/making-your-issues-fancy-following-my-post-of »

phyland84:

panovanator:

Making your issues fancy

Following my post of the comic book issues that I have bound into hardcover books, a request was made for a book binding tutorial - and I am happy to oblige! Here is the full process of making your issues soopa-fancy.

Tools you will need:

- Large binder clips…

OMG this is awesome. Somehow I missed it when it was posted—definitely going to be trying this!

To-do

Posted 1 week ago , with 179 notes
via phyland84panovanator)


leseanthomas:

Here’s some of the most amazing and invaluable advice you’ll most-likely ever get from one of my good colleagues and legends in comics/gaming, creator JOE MADUREIRA. It’s what i’ve been preaching to you aspiring artists since i arrived on DA, but i think his POV says it perfectly:

*WARNING: SOME MATURE LANGUAGE*

"DO YOU REALLY WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST? 


Or a successful WORKING PROFESSIONAL?



Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: "Where should I go to school?" "What classes should I take?" "What should I study for anatomy?" "What pencils and paper do you use?" "Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?" "How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?" "When am I going to develop my own style?" "Who were your influences?" "Teach me how to draw hands!" The list goes on…


Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are 'failing' professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is.

In no particular order:


1) DO WHAT YOU LOVE. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will.

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

4) RELATIONSHIPS ARE IMPORTANT. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere.

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always "The market isn’t great right now" "Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well" "The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail." "I’m not sure I’m good enough." "I need the money." "Too Risky." "I tried it before and failed. " It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there.

But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when 'Conan' was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their ‘next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. "Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…" one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us.

Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!”



zoebalthus:

Black Cat - 1990 - Tadashige Nishida, Japan

zoebalthus:

Black Cat - 1990 - Tadashige Nishida, Japan



Shy bespectacled brown boy with beard & bun

Tough girl

Party slop and some cats

Actually, these are character development for a slipshine story I’m scheduled to do in the future and probably haven’t mentioned here.

Shy bespectacled brown boy with beard & bun

Tough girl

Party slop and some cats

Actually, these are character development for a slipshine story I’m scheduled to do in the future and probably haven’t mentioned here.

Posted 2 weeks ago , with 3 notes


Today’s inspiration.



ericscottpfeiffer:

New from Kid Havoc. Brush and Ink 19 x 24” More details soon.

Damn though.

ericscottpfeiffer:

New from Kid Havoc. Brush and Ink 19 x 24” More details soon.

Damn though.



Just two ghouls in love.

Painted for a poster show benefitting my late friend/mentor Kerry Talbott’s family with “Monstrous Optimism” in mind.

Just two ghouls in love.

Painted for a poster show benefitting my late friend/mentor Kerry Talbott’s family with “Monstrous Optimism” in mind.

Posted 1 month ago , with 38 notes


Two illustrations of chicks and dudes skating for local vintage skate rink Skateland of Richmond!

(…Which, when put together, kind of look like they’re gonna fight.)

Two illustrations of chicks and dudes skating for local vintage skate rink Skateland of Richmond!

(…Which, when put together, kind of look like they’re gonna fight.)

Posted 2 months ago , with 9 notes


royalboiler:

Xurxo sent a revised version of the"Brief Manual for Cartoonists" by Moebius" Xurxo’s Tumbr here
I reviewed this thing and re translated a lot of it as well as corrected stuff from the auto correct and my own rushed mistakes.some points are more clear now and some remain ambiguous, they also are unclear on the spanish version. it’d be great to listen to how he actually said all these things, as some of them have clearly a colloquial humour element, for the crowd; like the stuff about editor demanding higher body counts, readers not buying books with poorly drawn women, grinning superheroes, aikido or jodorowsky’s dead horse allegation … which is something he did often speaking in public. "Brief Manual for Cartoonists" by Moebius
1. When drawing (by drawing), one must cleanse oneself of profound feelings; hate, happiness, ambition, etc.
2. It’s important to educate the hand, attain obedience, to fulfil our ideas; But we must be careful with perfection. To much perfection and too much speed, as well as their opposites are dangerous. 
When there is to much ease (looseness, fluidity), as on instant drawings, aside from there being mistakes, there’s no will of the spirit but only the body.
3. Perspective is of sum importance, it is a law of manipulation in the good sense of the word, to hypnotise the reader. 
It’s recommended to work on real spaces (directly from reality), more that with photographs, to exercise our reading of perspective.
4. Another thing to be learnt with affection is the study of the human body, the positions, the types, the expressions, the architecture of bodies, the difference between people. 
Drawing is very different when it comes to a male or a female; because in the male you can change the lines a little, there are some imprecisions that it can support to have. But with the female precision must be perfect, if not it may become ugly or look upset. then they wont buy our book! 
For the reader to believe the story, the characters must have life and a personality of their own, gestures that come from their character, from their diseases (illnesses); 
The body transforms with life and there’s a message within the structure, in the distribution of fat, in every muscle, in every crease of the face and the body. 
It is a study of life.
5. When a story is being made one can start without knowing everything, but making annotations (in the actual story) about the particular world of that story. That way the reader recognises himself and becomes interested (invested). 
When a character dies in a cartoon, and such character does not have a story drawn in his face, in his body, in his attire, the reader does not care, there’s no emotion; Then the editors say: ”Your story is worthless! There’s only one dead guy and I need 20 or 30 dead guys for it to work!”. But that is not true, if the dead, or the wounded or the ill or whomever is in trouble has a real personality that comes from study, from the artists capacity for observation, emotion will emerge (empathy). 
In these studies an attention for others is also developed, a compassion and a love for humanity (mankind).
It is very important for the development of an artist; If he wants to be a mirror, he must contain inside its consciousness the whole world, a mirror that sees (looks at) everything.
6. Jodorowsky says that I don’t like to draw dead horses. It’s very difficult. It’s very difficult to draw a body that sleeps, that’s abandoned, because in comics action is always being studied. it’s easier to draw people fighting, thats why Americans draw superheroes. 
It’s more difficult to draw people talking, because there are a series of movements, very small, but that have a significance, and that accounts for (costs) more, because it requires a love, an attention to the other, to the little things that speak about personality, about life. 
The superheroes have no personality, all of them have the same gestures and movements (pantomimes ferocity, running and fighting)
7. Equally important is the clothing of the characters, the state they’re in, the materials and the textures are a vision of their experiences, of their lives, of their situation within the adventure, that can say a lot with out words. 
In a dress there are a thousand folds;  2 or 3 must be chosen, but the good ones.
8. The style, the stylistic continuity of an artist is symbolic, it can be read like the tarot. 
I chose, as a joke, the name Moebius, when I was 22, but in truth (in reality) there is a significance to that. If you bring a t-shirt with a Don Quixote, that speaks to me of who you are. 
In my case, I give importance to a type of drawing of relative simplicity, in this way subtle indications can be made.
9. When an artist, a drawing artist goes out on the street, he does not see the same things other people see (normal people). What he sees is documentation about the way of life, about the people.
10. Another important element is composition. Composition on our stories must be studied, because a page or a painting, is a face that looks towards (faces) the reader and that tells him something. It’s not a succession of panels with out meaning. 
There are full panels and empty ones, others that have a vertical dynamism or a horizontal one and in all of that there is an intention. The vertical excites (cheers); the horizontal calms, an oblique to the right , for us westerners (western readers), represents the action that heads towards the future; an oblique to the left directs the action toward the past. Points (points of attention) represent a dispersion of energy. Something placed in the middle focalises the energy and the attention, it concentrates.
These are basic symbols for reading, that exert a fascination, a hypnosis (over the reader). 
A awareness must be had about rhythm; set a trap for the reader to fall into and he falls, gets lost and moves inside it with pleasure, because there’s life (inside the trap). 
The great painters must be studied, the ones that speak with their paintings, of any school or period, that does not matter, and they must be seen (studied) with that preoccupation for physical composition, but also emotional. In what way the combination of lines by that artist touches us directly in the heart.
11. Narration must harmonise with the drawing. There must be a visual rhythm even from the placement of words, plot must correctly manoeuvre cadence (tone), to compress or expand time. 
Must be careful with the election (casting) and the direction of characters. Utilise them as a film director and study all the different takes.
12. Careful with the devastating influence of north american comics in Mexico, because they only study a little anatomy, dynamic composition, the monsters, the fights, the screams and teeth (grin). 
I like them as well, but there are many other possibilities that must be explored.
13. There’s a connection between music and drawing. But that depends also on the personality and the moment. 
For around 10 years I’ve been working in silence, and for me the music is rhythm of the lines (the music he listens to).
To draw is sometimes to hunt for findings; an exact (fair, just) line is an orgasm!
14. Color is a language that the artist (drawing artist) uses to manipulate the readers attention and to create beauty. There’s objective and subjective color, the emotional states (moods) of the characters influence the coloring and lighting can change from one panel to the next, depending on the space being represented and the time of the day. 
The language of color must be studied with attention.
15. At the beginning of a career, specially, one should attempt to create short stories but of a very high quality. There’s a better chance to finish them successfully and place them on books (anthologies) or with editors.
16. There are times when knowingly we head to failure, we choose a theme (subject), an extension (page length), a technique that does not suit us (convene). 
Must not complain afterwards.
17. When new pages are sent to the editors and are rejected, we should ask for the reasons. This reasons for failure must be studied and learn. 
It’s not about the struggle, with our limitations or with public or the publishers. It’s more about treating it like in aikido; the strength (power) of who charges is used to knock him with a minimum effort.
18. Now it is possible to find readers in any part of the planet. We must have this present. 
To begin with, drawing is a way of personal communication, but this does not imply that the artist must envelop himself in his own bubble; it’s communication with the beings closest to us, with oneself, but also with unknown people. 
Drawing is a medium to communicate with the great family that we have not met, the public, the world.
Mexico, August 18th 1996 compiled by Perez Ruizlink to the original article in spanishhttp://www.jornada.unam.mx/1996/08/18/sem-moebius.html

royalboiler:

Xurxo sent a revised version of the"Brief Manual for Cartoonists" by Moebius" Xurxo’s Tumbr here

  • I reviewed this thing and re translated a lot of it as well as corrected stuff from the auto correct and my own rushed mistakes.
    some points are more clear now and some remain ambiguous, they also are unclear on the spanish version. 
    it’d be great to listen to how he actually said all these things, as some of them have clearly a colloquial humour element, for the crowd; like the stuff about editor demanding higher body counts, readers not buying books with poorly drawn women, grinning superheroes, aikido or jodorowsky’s dead horse allegation … which is something he did often speaking in public. 

    "Brief Manual for Cartoonists" by Moebius
  • 1. When drawing (by drawing), one must cleanse oneself of profound feelings; hate, happiness, ambition, etc.
  • 2. It’s important to educate the hand, attain obedience, to fulfil our ideas; But we must be careful with perfection. To much perfection and too much speed, as well as their opposites are dangerous. 
  • When there is to much ease (looseness, fluidity), as on instant drawings, aside from there being mistakes, there’s no will of the spirit but only the body.
  • 3. Perspective is of sum importance, it is a law of manipulation in the good sense of the word, to hypnotise the reader. 
  • It’s recommended to work on real spaces (directly from reality), more that with photographs, to exercise our reading of perspective.
  • 4. Another thing to be learnt with affection is the study of the human body, the positions, the types, the expressions, the architecture of bodies, the difference between people. 
  • Drawing is very different when it comes to a male or a female; because in the male you can change the lines a little, there are some imprecisions that it can support to have. But with the female precision must be perfect, if not it may become ugly or look upset. then they wont buy our book! 
  • For the reader to believe the story, the characters must have life and a personality of their own, gestures that come from their character, from their diseases (illnesses); 
  • The body transforms with life and there’s a message within the structure, in the distribution of fat, in every muscle, in every crease of the face and the body. 
  • It is a study of life.
  • 5. When a story is being made one can start without knowing everything, but making annotations (in the actual story) about the particular world of that story. That way the reader recognises himself and becomes interested (invested). 
  • When a character dies in a cartoon, and such character does not have a story drawn in his face, in his body, in his attire, the reader does not care, there’s no emotion; Then the editors say: ”Your story is worthless! There’s only one dead guy and I need 20 or 30 dead guys for it to work!”. But that is not true, if the dead, or the wounded or the ill or whomever is in trouble has a real personality that comes from study, from the artists capacity for observation, emotion will emerge (empathy). 
  • In these studies an attention for others is also developed, a compassion and a love for humanity (mankind).
  • It is very important for the development of an artist; If he wants to be a mirror, he must contain inside its consciousness the whole world, a mirror that sees (looks at) everything.
  • 6. Jodorowsky says that I don’t like to draw dead horses. It’s very difficult. It’s very difficult to draw a body that sleeps, that’s abandoned, because in comics action is always being studied. it’s easier to draw people fighting, thats why Americans draw superheroes. 
  • It’s more difficult to draw people talking, because there are a series of movements, very small, but that have a significance, and that accounts for (costs) more, because it requires a love, an attention to the other, to the little things that speak about personality, about life. 
  • The superheroes have no personality, all of them have the same gestures and movements (pantomimes ferocity, running and fighting)
  • 7. Equally important is the clothing of the characters, the state they’re in, the materials and the textures are a vision of their experiences, of their lives, of their situation within the adventure, that can say a lot with out words. 
  • In a dress there are a thousand folds;  2 or 3 must be chosen, but the good ones.
  • 8. The style, the stylistic continuity of an artist is symbolic, it can be read like the tarot. 
  • I chose, as a joke, the name Moebius, when I was 22, but in truth (in reality) there is a significance to that. If you bring a t-shirt with a Don Quixote, that speaks to me of who you are. 
  • In my case, I give importance to a type of drawing of relative simplicity, in this way subtle indications can be made.
  • 9. When an artist, a drawing artist goes out on the street, he does not see the same things other people see (normal people). What he sees is documentation about the way of life, about the people.
  • 10. Another important element is composition. Composition on our stories must be studied, because a page or a painting, is a face that looks towards (faces) the reader and that tells him something. It’s not a succession of panels with out meaning. 
  • There are full panels and empty ones, others that have a vertical dynamism or a horizontal one and in all of that there is an intention. The vertical excites (cheers); the horizontal calms, an oblique to the right , for us westerners (western readers), represents the action that heads towards the future; an oblique to the left directs the action toward the past. Points (points of attention) represent a dispersion of energy. Something placed in the middle focalises the energy and the attention, it concentrates.
  • These are basic symbols for reading, that exert a fascination, a hypnosis (over the reader). 
  • A awareness must be had about rhythm; set a trap for the reader to fall into and he falls, gets lost and moves inside it with pleasure, because there’s life (inside the trap). 
  • The great painters must be studied, the ones that speak with their paintings, of any school or period, that does not matter, and they must be seen (studied) with that preoccupation for physical composition, but also emotional. In what way the combination of lines by that artist touches us directly in the heart.
  • 11. Narration must harmonise with the drawing. There must be a visual rhythm even from the placement of words, plot must correctly manoeuvre cadence (tone), to compress or expand time. 
  • Must be careful with the election (casting) and the direction of characters. Utilise them as a film director and study all the different takes.
  • 12. Careful with the devastating influence of north american comics in Mexico, because they only study a little anatomy, dynamic composition, the monsters, the fights, the screams and teeth (grin). 
  • I like them as well, but there are many other possibilities that must be explored.
  • 13. There’s a connection between music and drawing. But that depends also on the personality and the moment. 
  • For around 10 years I’ve been working in silence, and for me the music is rhythm of the lines (the music he listens to).
  • To draw is sometimes to hunt for findings; an exact (fair, just) line is an orgasm!
  • 14. Color is a language that the artist (drawing artist) uses to manipulate the readers attention and to create beauty. There’s objective and subjective color, the emotional states (moods) of the characters influence the coloring and lighting can change from one panel to the next, depending on the space being represented and the time of the day. 
  • The language of color must be studied with attention.
  • 15. At the beginning of a career, specially, one should attempt to create short stories but of a very high quality. There’s a better chance to finish them successfully and place them on books (anthologies) or with editors.
  • 16. There are times when knowingly we head to failure, we choose a theme (subject), an extension (page length), a technique that does not suit us (convene). 
  • Must not complain afterwards.
  • 17. When new pages are sent to the editors and are rejected, we should ask for the reasons. This reasons for failure must be studied and learn. 
  • It’s not about the struggle, with our limitations or with public or the publishers. It’s more about treating it like in aikido; the strength (power) of who charges is used to knock him with a minimum effort.
  • 18. Now it is possible to find readers in any part of the planet. We must have this present. 
  • To begin with, drawing is a way of personal communication, but this does not imply that the artist must envelop himself in his own bubble; it’s communication with the beings closest to us, with oneself, but also with unknown people. 
  • Drawing is a medium to communicate with the great family that we have not met, the public, the world.
  • Mexico, August 18th 1996 compiled by Perez Ruiz


    link to the original article in spanish
    http://www.jornada.unam.mx/1996/08/18/sem-moebius.html


Today’s sketch makes me feel weird.

Today’s sketch makes me feel weird.

Posted 2 months ago , with 11 notes